Beaujolais Villages

French wine produced in the north of the Rhone department and on some communes of the Saône-et-Loire, the Beaujolais Village is the most southern wine of the Burgundy region. Most of the production consists of red wine made from the gamay grape, close to the Pinot Noir grape. Here Gamay finds his letters of nobility. The...
French wine produced in the north of the Rhone department and on some communes of the Saône-et-Loire, the Beaujolais Village is the most southern wine of the Burgundy region. Most of the production consists of red wine made from the gamay grape, close to the Pinot Noir grape. Here Gamay finds his letters of nobility. The vinification of Beaujolais-villages uses the method of Beaujolais vinification, which uses carbonic maceration in particular. It is to macerate the whole clusters of four to seven days in tanks saturated in CO2. This carbon monoxide is obtained by first fermenting part of the crop (10-30%) at the bottom of the tank, crushed and yeast, to which the rest of the crop whose clusters must be most intact possible must be added ( Not scratched and not crushed, the berries must not be crushed). This process favors the production of low tannic wines, not too sustained coloring and fruity aromas. The wines approved in Beaujolais-villages are mostly fruity and gouleyants (easy to drink). They retain their qualities between one and three years, but with the exception of a few special cuvées, they are not wines. The Beaujolais-villages from the terroirs of the ten Beaujolais wines, for example, are made in assemblage of the different cuvées, are more structured, some aging a little better, but less fruity.
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